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10 Best Basin Wrenches 2021 – Reviews & Top Picks

close up using HAUTMEC PL0025 Pro Telescoping Basin Wrench

Basin wrenches are a specialized tool for your sinks that you won’t need very often, but you want a good quality brand that allows you to reach the nuts holding your faucet and supply enough torque to get them loose. With so many different brands available, it can be difficult to sort through them all and find one suitable for your home.

We’ve chosen ten different brands that are easy to find online or in your favorite home improvement store to review for you, so you can compare them and see the difference in quality. We’ll tell you about our experience using the and the pros and cons of each. We’ve also included a short buyer’s guide where we take a closer look at the basin wrench to see how they work and what you should look for while shopping.

Join us while we look at shaft length, T-handles, durability, weight, clearance, and more to help you make an educated purchase.

A Quick Comparison of Our Favorites

Image Product Details
Best Overall
Winner
General Tools Telescoping Basin Wrench General Tools Telescoping Basin Wrench
  • Telescoping
  • Pivoting jaw
  • Ratcheting
  • Best Value
    Second place
    TEKTON WRN92001 Basin Wrench TEKTON WRN92001 Basin Wrench
  • Spring-loaded jaw
  • 11-inch shaft
  • Sliding T-handle
  • Premium Choice
    Third place
    Rothenberger Telescopic Basin Nut Wrench Rothenberger Telescopic Basin Nut Wrench
  • Chrome plated
  • Pivoting head
  • 54 pounds
  • HAUTMEC PL0025 Pro Telescoping Basin Wrench HAUTMEC PL0025 Pro Telescoping Basin Wrench
  • Spring-loaded jaws
  • Pivoting head
  • Hanging hook
  • RIDGID 31175 Basin Wrench RIDGID 31175 Basin Wrench
  • Spring-loaded jaws
  • Forged steel
  • Tension plug
  • The 10 Best Basin Wrenches – Reviews 2021

    1. General Tools Telescoping Basin Wrench – Best Overall

    General Tools 140XL Telescoping Basin Wrench Large Jaw, Extends from 11 to 16-Inches

    The General Tools Telescoping Basin Wrench is our pick for the best overall basin wrench. The durable tool has steel construction and is extendable from 11 to 16 inches for extra flexibility. The ratcheting head pivots in both directions so you can use it to tighten or loosen nuts, and the spring-loaded jaws provide a tight and stable grip. It’s lightweight at only 1.66 pounds and works on 1 to 2-inch nuts of any type.

    The only problem we had while using the General Tools was that it was hard to push the button to adjust the telescoping body.

    Pros
    • Telescoping
    • Pivoting jaw
    • Ratcheting
    • Spring-loaded
    • 66 pounds
    • Works on 1- to 2-inch nuts
    Cons
    • Hard to adjust the length

    2. TEKTON WRN92001 Basin Wrench – Best Value

    TEKTON WRN92001 11 Inch Basin Wrench

    The TEKTON WRN92001 Basin Wrench is our pick for the best basin tree for the money. It’s a smaller size tool than our top pick but has many of the same features. The spring-loaded jaw will grab on to any nut between 3/8 and 1-inch, and the 180-degree tilting head allows you to use it to loosen or tighten the nuts. It has an 11-inch shaft with a sliding T-handle to get maximum leverage and torque, and it’s very lightweight at only 1.08 pounds.

    The biggest problem we had while using the TEKTON WRN92001 was that the sliding T-handle continuously falls off the wrench, so you have to pick it up and put it back in, which can get annoying and extend your work session.

    Pros
    • 3/8-inch to 1-inch nuts
    • 180-degree pivoting head
    • Spring-loaded jaw
    • 11-inch shaft
    • Sliding T-handle
    • 08 pounds
    Cons
    • T-handle slips out

    3. Rothenberger Telescopic Basin Nut Wrench – Premium Choice

    Rothenberger Telescopic Basin Nut Wrench

    The Rothenberger Telescopic Basin Nut Wrench is our premium choice basin wrench. It features a four-position telescoping handle that’s adjustable in four lengths for maximum versatility. The pivoting head lets you use the tool to tighten and loosen nuts and allows you to work at odd angles. The spring-loaded jaw grips nuts from 3.8 to 1.25 inches, which covers a wide variety of sinks, and the chrome plating is attractive.

    We enjoyed using the Rothenberger, and the only thing we had trouble with was that it’s a little bulky at times, especially when working with the smaller 3/8-inch nuts.

    Pros
    • Telescoping
    • Chrome plated
    • Pivoting head
    • 54 pounds
    • Spring-loaded jaw
    • 3/8 to 1.25-inch nuts
    Cons
    • Bulky

    4. HAUTMEC PL0025 Pro Telescoping Basin Wrench

    HAUTMEC PL0025 Pro Telescoping Basin Wrench

    The HAUTMEC PL0025 Pro Telescoping Basin Wrench is another telescoping basin wrench that will extend from 10 to 17-inches in four increments. Its spring-loaded jaws can work with any nuts 3/8 to 1.25-inches wide, and the pivoting head allows you to work with multiple angles. It’s lightweight at only 1.5 pounds and features a hardened steel chrome plated shaft that won’t bend if using extension bars.

    While we were using the HAUTMEC PL0025, the biggest problem we had was that the spring-loaded jaws didn’t always hold the nut securely and would allow it to slip. Gripping the jaws with your hand would prevent the slipping, but it wasn’t always possible to do so.

    Pros
    • 3/8 to 1.25-inch nuts
    • Telescopic shaft
    • Spring-loaded jaws
    • Pivoting head
    • Hanging hook
    • Chrome plated
    • Hardened steel
    • 5 pounds
    Cons
    • Doesn’t always grip tightly

    5. RIDGID 31175 Basin Wrench

    RIDGID 31175 Basin Wrench

    The RIDGID 31175 Basin Wrench is an extremely lightweight basin wrench that weighs less than 4 ounces. Its spring-loaded jaws can grip nuts between 3/8 and 1.25-inch wide, and it has a swivel head to tighten or loosen nuts. One unique feature that this model has is a tension plug that allows you to lock the head to prevent it from swiveling while you work. It also has a telescoping shaft that extends from 10 to 17 inches.

    The RIDGID 31175 worked well while we were using it, but it would often take a few tries for the jaws to catch the nut. It’s also a bit bulky to use in some of the smaller sinks, and the head rust quickly, so you’ll want to store it in a dry place or wipe it down with lightweight oil.

    Pros
    • Spring-loaded jaws
    • Forged steel
    • Tension plug
    • Telescopic
    • 3/8 to 1.25-inch nuts
    • Lightweight
    • Pivoting head
    Cons
    • Bulky
    • Rusts easily
    • Takes a few tries

    6. Superior Tool 03811 Basin Wrench

    Superior Tool 03811 Basin Wrench

    The Superior Tool 03811 Basin Wrench features a slimline 11-inch shaft. It’s much easier to fit into tiny spaces than telescoping models, and its pivoting head allows you to tighten and loosen nuts. It grips nuts with its spring-loaded jaws, and a sliding T-handle makes it easier to produce enough torque to release the nuts.

    The downside we experienced while using the Superior Tool was that it requires two hands to keep the jaws from slipping, and on many occasions, it took several tries to get a good grip on the nut. The maximum nut size of one inch is also a little smaller than many basin nuts in use.

    Pros
    • 11-inch shaft
    • Pivoting head
    • Spring-loaded jaws
    Cons
    • 3/8 to 1-inch nuts
    • Takes several tries

    7. Armour Line RP77335 Basin Wrench

    Armour Line RP77335 Basin Wrench

    The Armour Line RP77335 Basin Wrench features steel construction and a slimline design to help get into smaller areas easier. It has a reversible head like the others, so you can tighten and loosen the nuts, and the hardened steel jaws won’t wear down or develop pits and craters. It’s lightweight at only 1.07 pounds, so it’s easy to maneuver and carry.

    We feel the Armour Line RP77335 is a useful tool, but it is limited to smaller applications. The 10.5-inch shaft is a little short for many jobs, and the maximum nut width is not enough for many standard kitchen sinks and some bathroom basins.

    Pros
    • Spring-loaded jaw
    • Reversible head
    • Steel construction
    • Hardened steel jaws
    • 07 pound
    Cons
    • 5-inch shaft
    • Up to 1-inch nuts
    • Hard to use

    8. ARES 33004 Basin Wrench

    ARES 33004 Basin Wrench

    The ARES 33004 Basin Wrench features a durable and attractive chrome vanadium steel wrench. The 11-inch shaft is long enough to reach most jobs, including those tricky to get with telescopic wrenches. It can work with any nut between 3/8 and 1.25 inches, and it’s lightweight at only 1.11 pounds.

    The main problem with the ARES 33004 Basin Wrench is that it is difficult to use. It requires one hand to open and clamp and then hold the clamp secure while turning the ratchet with the other hand, which is not very convenient or always possible.

    Pros
    • 11-inch shaft
    • 3/8 to 1.25-inch nuts
    • Sliding T-handle
    • Chrome vanadium steel
    • 11 pounds
    Cons
    • Difficult to use

    9. LASCO 13-2035 Metal Telescopic Basin Wrench

    LASCO 13-2035 Metal Telescopic Basin Wrench

    the LASCO 13-2035 Metal Telescopic Basin Wrench features a telescopic body that extends from 9 to 16-inches. It has a swivel head that will accept a nut up to one inch in diameter and a sliding T-handle that lets you get a good grip to supply enough torque to release rusted-on nuts and bolts.

    Unfortunately, the LASCO 13-2035 is not very easy to use because it takes some time to get the teeth to lock on to the nut and often slips while trying to release it, extending your work time and increasing frustration. The extendable shaft is thin and feels like cheap metal, and though we didn’t have any problems, it might bend under heavy torque. The one-inch jaws will not fit many sinks, requiring a larger tool for many jobs.

    Pros
    • Telescopic
    • Sliding T-handle
    • Swivel head
    Cons
    • Two pounds
    • Cheap quality
    • Doesn’t grip well
    • 1-inch max

    10. GreatNeck BA11 Basin Wrench

    GreatNeck BA11 Basin Wrench

    The GreatNeck BA11 Basin Wrench is the last basin wrench on our list to review for you. This model has an 11-inch shaft and is lightweight at only 1.05 pounds. The shaft is durable alloy steel with a chrome plating to reduce the risk of rust, and the head swivels for tightening and loosening.

    The downside to the GreatNeck BA11 is that it has a difficult time gripping. Even when holding the head, it slips when applying torque. The jaw teeth are not as hard as most of the others, and after a few jobs, there were noticeable dents and groves in the metal. We also felt that the T-handle was a little short for the tool, making it hard to apply enough torque to loosen the nuts.

    Pros
    • 11-inch shaft
    • Chrome plated
    • 05 pounds
    • Alloy steel
    • Reversible head
    Cons
    • Doesn’t grip
    • Teeth wear down
    • T-handle isn’t long enough

    Buyer’s Guide

    Here are some things to consider before choosing a basin wrench for your home.

    What is a Basin Wrench?

    A basin wrench is a specialized tool that can reach the nuts that hold the faucet on your sink. These nuts are hard to reach and difficult to see because of their location behind the basin. The basin wrench has a shape that can reach these nuts and help you remove them.

    Jaw Size

    The most important thing you need to look for when choosing a basin wrench is the nut size it can accept. If the tool can’t fit, it’s useless. We have found that wrenches that accept nuts up to 1.25-inches wide to be the most useful and versatile, but if you have a specific problem you are fixing, it’s best to find out how large the nut is and purchase a capable tool.

    Many kitchen sinks have nuts larger than 1 inch, so we recommend making sure your brand is ready for these larger jobs.

    Shaft

    The shaft, or handle, is the main part of the tool. Some tools have a set length between 10 and 12-inches long, with most right at the 11-inch mark, which is about right for most jobs. Other tools have an extendable shaft, and these can be as short as 9 inches and extend out to 16. Telescopic shafts can be a huge help in certain situations, but they can also be quite bulky and be hard to fit behind the basin.

    We recommend a shaft at least 11-inches long to make sure you can reach any nuts and have enough space to maintain a good grip.

    Swivel Head

    All of the brands on this list have a swivel head that will allow you to work at any angle and tighten and loosen your nuts and bolts. The swivel head also allows you to remove or tighten reverse threaded nuts that are commonly plastic. We recommend the swivel head because it is more versatile than the fixed style, which only works in one direction.

    Spring Loaded Jaw Teeth

    The reason the head only works in one direction has to do with the teeth in the jaw. These teeth are angled to grip the teeth in one direction but allow a ratcheting action in reverse. Built-in ratcheting will enable you to use

    the tool with one hand in most cases. If the tool could not ratchet, you would need to reattach it to the nut after each turn.

    The jaws use a spring to get a grip on the nut. If the spring does not provide enough closing power, the teeth may not hold the nut as you make a turn and could slip. Jaws with too strong a spring may be challenging to open to get around your nut, especially since you can’t see where you are working. We tried to point out any brands that are difficult to get on the nut or slip frequently. In some cases, you can help the tool by using your free hand to help the teeth grip better, but it isn’t ideal.

    T-Handle

    The sliding T-handle is pretty standard on most basin wrenches. It’s at the end of the shaft and helps you apply enough torque to break the nuts. You can also add an extension bar to this part of the tool to increase torque for corroded or rusted nuts. The T-handle is one area that can differ from brand to brand, with some being shorter than others or thinner, so they bend easily. In one case, the t-handle kept falling out, and you might lose it, but you can use channel lock pliers or an adjustable wrench as a replacement if necessary.

    using RIDGID 31175 Basin Wrench

    Weight

    Weight may not seem like a big issue with the basin wrench, but it can quickly become heavy if you are having difficulty getting it to grip the nut. Just a few ounces can make a large difference, so we recommend looking for a brand that weighs less than two pounds. Most brands on our list are lightweight, but you may find some that are quite heavy if you continue to shop.

    Durability

    Shaft

    Most basin wrenches are made from steel to provide plenty of strength and resistance to bending. The shaft can be solid steel or a hollow square tube. In either case, you will want to make sure it’s thick enough to retain its shape as you apply torque. If the metal is too thin and flimsy, it will bend and ruin the tool. We tried to list any tools in our reviews that used weak or thin steel.

    Jaws

    Another area to check for durability is the jaw. Jaws that are too soft will begin to deteriorate after using the tool a few times. The teeth can wear down and dent, making it harder to get a grip on nuts in the future and cause it to slip as you are using it. Look for tools that use hardened steel for the jaws for increased durability.

    Chrome Plating

    Chrome plating on your basin wrench will not only make the tool look better, but it will also increase its resistance to rust and other forms of corrosion. We listed all the chrome-plated tools as we reviewed them, and you should choose them if other tools you own have a lot of rut on them.

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    Conclusion

    When it comes to basin wrenches, we feel the General Tools Telescoping Basin Wrench is the best option for most people. Our pick for the best overall features a telescoping shaft with a pivoting head and a ratcheting jaw. It can loosen any nuts between one and two inches, fitting most sinks in the kitchen or bathroom. If your sinks are on the smaller size, you can probably get away with our best value. This tool has a smaller jaw and can only loosen nuts up to 1-inch. The shaft is also fixed and is not telescoping, but it is just as high quality as our first choice.

    We hope you have enjoyed reading over these reviews and found a suitable brand for your home. If we have helped answer your questions, please share this guide to the best basin wrenches on Facebook and Twitter.

    Other types of wrenches we’ve reviewed:

    –> Allen wrenches

    –> Wrench organizers

    –> What’s the difference between a monkey wrench and a pipe wrench?

    Note: we just released an article on adjustable wrenches. Feel free to read it here!

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